How many steps do I really need?

Did you ever wonder if taking 10,000 steps can actually lead to better health? A recent study by Lee et al. (2019) suggest that taking 10,000 steps per day will not necessarily make you healthier or live longer. In a group of 16,741 women with an average age of 72, they found that as few as 4,400 steps per day can lower mortality rates during a 4.3 year follow-up compared to their less active counterparts taking only 2,700 steps per day (Lee et al., 2019). The more steps an individual takes the lower the mortality rate up for up to 7,500 steps at which it levels off.

So, how much time is needed 7,000+ steps? In a 2005 study by Jordan, Jurca, Locke, Chruch, & Blair, 150 minutes per week (21-22 minutes per day) is plenty. If the steps are added to a baseline of 4,600 steps per day it will amount to 7,000 steps per day which also meets the guidelines set forth by the US Department of Health and Human Services back in 2018 (US Department of Health and Human Services, 2018).

How do I track my steps? Steps can tracked using wearable technology, such as a smartphone/smart watches, Fitbits, etc.

In short, staying active can decrease your risk for cardiovascular events, diabetes, obesity, & overall improvement of your well-being!

So get moving! 

 

 

Reference list

Jordan, A., Jurca, G, Locke,  C., Church, T., & Blair  S. Pedometer indices for weekly physical activity recommendations in postmenopausal women.  Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2005;37(9):1627-1632. doi:10.1249/01.mss.0000177455.58960.aa

Lee, I-Min., Shiroma, E.J., & Kamada, Masamitsu. (2019, May 29). Association of Step Volume and Intensity With All-Cause mortality in Older Women. JAMA Intern Med. https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/2734709

US Department of Health and Human Services. Physical activity guidelines for Americans, 2nd edition. https://health.gov/sites/default/files/2019-09/Physical_Activity_Guidelines_2nd_edition.pdf. Published 2018. Accessed May 11, 2020.

Author
Kristian Oarde, DNP, FNP-C Kristian Oarde is a board certified Family Nurse Practitioner who provides comprehensive pain management to both acute and chronic pain patients. Kristian started as a Registered Nurse in 2008 with backgrounds in Medical-Surgical, Oncology, Leadership, and spent most of his career in the Emergency Department. He received his training and degree of Doctor of Nursing Practice from The University of Arizona in Tucson, AZ. With over a decade of healthcare experience, Kristian utilizes a holistic approach to assess, treat, and evaluate the patient and the community he serves. He especially enjoys building relationships and working with individuals from all walks of life to help them as they establish and maintain their healthcare needs and goals. Kristian is currently seeing patients at our Sun City and Sun City West locations.

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